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Recycling Rates Across UK Raise To Highest Ever Level in 2012

Published on 09 May 2014
Recycling Rates Across UK Raise To Highest Ever Level in 2012
Figures recently released by Defra show that Britain’s recycling rate is at its highest ever figure, with a collaboration between local authorities showing that the combined recycling and composting rate reached 43.6% across the entirety of 2012 (up 0.6% on 2011). The figures for 2013 have not yet been released.
But how do the figures breakdown? What are we recycling and what areas do we have to improve on?
Waste Sent to Landfill
Well, the data released shows us that the proportion of municipal waste treated through energy from waste incineration reached its highest point in the final quarter of 2012, with 1,457,000 tonnes of waste sent for incineration.
The amount of waste sent to landfill fell during this period, with 34% of waste being disposed via this method (that’s 2,004,000 tonnes if you’re a stat fan). Such a figure is down by over 250,000 tonnes down than what it was in the same quarter of 2011 but sadly, landfill was still the most common route of waste disposal for England’s waste. Although this is undoubtedly brilliant news, we must also acknowledge that the total kg of waste per person sent to landfill in 2012 still stood at a staggering 432kg, thus proving that there is still much more work to be done.
Recycled Household Waste
The amount of recycled household waste was one of the key finding from the data, and once again showed that the message about recycling is finally beginning to break through across the country. The amount of household waste successfully recycled broke the 40% barrier in the October-December quarter, and the final figure of 40.9% is up 1% from 2011. As a whole, the annual figure that includes composed and reused materials managed to reach 43.6%. The challenge now appears to be pushing this figure towards the 50% barrier.
Reaching the 50% Barrier
So, the question now remains: how do we reach the 50% barrier? There are a number of suggestions available, but it appears as though the steady rise in the figures we have seen recently that the public are starting to pay attention. The 2 main ideas floated around at present are:
1.      Reducing bin collections to force people to recycle more
2.      Charging for the amount of non-recyclable rubbish collected at each house
Whether either of these ideas are actually feasible is another matter, but it is clear that despite improvements being made, further changes are needed to make sure that Britain meets its 2020 waste disposal targets.
Recycling Rates Across UK Raise To Highest Ever Level in 2012
Figures recently released by Defra show that Britain’s recycling rate is at its highest ever figure, with a collaboration between local authorities showing that the combined recycling and composting rate reached 43.6% across the entirety of 2012 (up 0.6% on 2011). The figures for 2013 have not yet been released.
But how do the figures breakdown? What are we recycling and what areas do we have to improve on?
Waste Sent to Landfill
Well, the data released shows us that the proportion of municipal waste treated through energy from waste incineration reached its highest point in the final quarter of 2012, with 1,457,000 tonnes of waste sent for incineration.
The amount of waste sent to landfill fell during this period, with 34% of waste being disposed via this method (that’s 2,004,000 tonnes if you’re a stat fan). Such a figure is down by over 250,000 tonnes down than what it was in the same quarter of 2011 but sadly, landfill was still the most common route of waste disposal for England’s waste. Although this is undoubtedly brilliant news, we must also acknowledge that the total kg of waste per person sent to landfill in 2012 still stood at a staggering 432kg, thus proving that there is still much more work to be done.
Recycled Household Waste
The amount of recycled household waste was one of the key finding from the data, and once again showed that the message about recycling is finally beginning to break through across the country. The amount of household waste successfully recycled broke the 40% barrier in the October-December quarter, and the final figure of 40.9% is up 1% from 2011. As a whole, the annual figure that includes composed and reused materials managed to reach 43.6%. The challenge now appears to be pushing this figure towards the 50% barrier.
Reaching the 50% Barrier
So, the question now remains: how do we reach the 50% barrier? There are a number of suggestions available, but it appears as though the steady rise in the figures we have seen recently that the public are starting to pay attention. The 2 main ideas floated around at present are:
1.      Reducing bin collections to force people to recycle more
2.      Charging for the amount of non-recyclable rubbish collected at each house
Whether either of these ideas are actually feasible is another matter, but it is clear that despite improvements being made, further changes are needed to make sure that Britain meets its 2020 waste disposal targets.
Recycling Rates Across UK Raise To Highest Ever Level in 2012
Figures recently released by Defra show that Britain’s recycling rate is at its highest ever figure, with a collaboration between local authorities showing that the combined recycling and composting rate reached 43.6% across the entirety of 2012 (up 0.6% on 2011). The figures for 2013 have not yet been released.
But how do the figures breakdown? What are we recycling and what areas do we have to improve on?
Waste Sent to Landfill
Well, the data released shows us that the proportion of municipal waste treated through energy from waste incineration reached its highest point in the final quarter of 2012, with 1,457,000 tonnes of waste sent for incineration.
The amount of waste sent to landfill fell during this period, with 34% of waste being disposed via this method (that’s 2,004,000 tonnes if you’re a stat fan). Such a figure is down by over 250,000 tonnes down than what it was in the same quarter of 2011 but sadly, landfill was still the most common route of waste disposal for England’s waste. Although this is undoubtedly brilliant news, we must also acknowledge that the total kg of waste per person sent to landfill in 2012 still stood at a staggering 432kg, thus proving that there is still much more work to be done.
Recycled Household Waste
The amount of recycled household waste was one of the key finding from the data, and once again showed that the message about recycling is finally beginning to break through across the country. The amount of household waste successfully recycled broke the 40% barrier in the October-December quarter, and the final figure of 40.9% is up 1% from 2011. As a whole, the annual figure that includes composed and reused materials managed to reach 43.6%. The challenge now appears to be pushing this figure towards the 50% barrier.
Reaching the 50% Barrier
So, the question now remains: how do we reach the 50% barrier? There are a number of suggestions available, but it appears as though the steady rise in the figures we have seen recently that the public are starting to pay attention. The 2 main ideas floated around at present are:
1.      Reducing bin collections to force people to recycle more
2.      Charging for the amount of non-recyclable rubbish collected at each house
Whether either of these ideas are actually feasible is another matter, but it is clear that despite improvements being made, further changes are needed to make sure that Britain meets its 2020 waste disposal targets.

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